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06 April 2016

Hypotheses Supporting the Cultural Unity of Global Afrikan People: We Are One People!

Excerpt: Ambakisye-Okang Olatunde Dukuzumurenyi,      : The Book of the Tep-HesebAn Afrikological Research MethodologyBeing An Afrikological Primer in Critical Thinking, Critical Listening, Critical Speaking, Critical Questioning, Critical Writing, Critical Reading & Critical Research In Pursuit of the Re-establishment of an Afrikan Njia towards a Re-construction of Afrikan Spiritual, Cognitive, Affective, Psychomotor Physiological, Social, Cultural, Historical, Political and Economic Reality (University of New Timbuktu System SBЗ/Seba Press, 2016) pp. 81-85.



Hypotheses Supporting the Cultural Unity of Global Afrikan People: We Are One People!

Ambakisye-Okang Olatunde Dukuzumurenyi, Ph.D. Public Policy Analysis



The narrative testimony of the Viasili vya Afrika [Kiswahili: Afrikan Explanations of Human Origins, Mythology] of Global Afrikan peoples, i.e., Watu Weusi now spread over the whole of the world and by inference to a Ufahamu [Kiswahili: Comprehension] of the contemporary reality of Watu Weusi as well as the rational ground for the reconstruction, development and implementation of sustainable Utamaduni defined solutions, begins for our purpose of conceptualizing the ST/Săt of this scholarly offering with the peoples of the Classical Afrikan Civilization of Utamaduni Mkubwa ya Bantu-Kush [Kiswahili: High Culture of Kush, Bantu-Kushite Civilization].

To reconstruct the Mapisi [Kiswahili: History] of this ST/Săt an Afrikan , 3XWY/Akhuy [Kush/Kemet: Spiritual], cognitive, affective, psychomotor physiological, socio-cultural, social-psychological, political-economic interpretation and assessment will be made of primary and secondary authentically Global Afrikan sources including on-site evaluations of extant Global Afrikan monuments where accessible, the Viasili and , 3XWY/Akhuy [Kush/Kemet: Spiritual] texts of Afrikan peoples of the Afrikan continent and the Afrikan global dispersions, the chronicles of the Viasili vya Afrika of ancient Watu Weusi priestly archivists, the Mapisi texts of ancient Afrikan Wanamapisi [Kiswahili: Historians] and poets and archaeological evidence.


While only cursory consideration will be given to the Eurocentrically defined limitations associated with the ‘validity’ of the various Viasili vya Afrika sources, the focus will be on the comprehension, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of the purposes, propositions, ideas, ideologies and beliefs of the evidence from an avowedly Global Afrikan socio-psychological orientation with the intent of reconstructing an authentic Global Afrikan-centered Afrocentric recollection of Mapisi ya Afrika [Kiswahili: History of Afrika], i.e., the narrative of the acts of the Wahenga na Wahenguzi [Kiswahili: the Venerated Ancestors of Ancestors], which answers to the guiding ethos of Utamaduni Mkubwa ya Afrika as distilled by the Wahenga na Wahenguzi on behalf of the Beautyful Ones Not Yet Born. 


By considering these sources as authorative it is naturally necessary to discard the socio-psychological restrictions and Utamaduni impediments of the false Eurocentric chronologies and concomitant methodologies and thus to correctly see the depth of space-time in Global Afrikan antiquity:


“…For those great pre-historic developments of civilization, and those long pre-historic ages of human activity and enterprise, which are indicated by the oldest monuments, records, and mythologies. It is impossible to study faithfully the ancient mythologies, or the results of exploration in the oldest ruins, or the fragmentary records in which the ancients speak of what to them was misty antiquity, without feeling that, to accept all they signify, we must enlarge the past far beyond the limits of any scheme of chronology known to modern times.”[1]

 
Global Afrikan knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation of Mapisi ya Afrika and any other subject, in order to be Afrikan-centered must begin with Global Afrikan chronicles, which utilize an Afrikan methodology, incorporate an Afrikan Utambuzi wa KD MI KD/Ked-Mi-Ked and therefore, are Afrocentric and thus an authentically Afrikan-centered way of thinking, doing and being. 


The texts inscribed in granite and written upon everlasting papyri by the Wahenga na Wahenguzi answer most definitively to this sacrosanct requisite. With these thoughts in mind it is now important to point out that this ST/Săt is grounded upon certain fundamental hypotheses. 


These hypotheses are:



H1:  
 
The Viasili vya Afrika, in particular the Viasili vya Utamaduni Mkubwa ya KMT/Kemet and the Viasili vya Utamaduni Mkubwa ya Bantu-Kushite Mycenae are comprised of the socio-cultural and historical record of the socio-political and economic acts of Global Afrikan peoples c. 15759 BKC - 3241 KC [c. 20000-1000 BCE], are written according to Global Afrikan traditional esoteric and allegorical methodologies that incorporate Global Afrikan cultural metaphors which require the decipherment of the metaphorical subject, metaphorical predicate and metaphorical entailments in the light of the comprehension of the Global Afrikan cultural metonymy and the key metaphor of Global Afrikan existence, i.e. the spiritual socio-organic metaphor and are as empirically sound a foundation for the reconstruction of Global Afrikan cognitive culture as are archeological and written historic records.


H2:
  
The Viasili vya Afrika are the chronicles of the exploits and deeds of the Bantu-Kushite Wahenga na Wahenguzi; or the ‘Gods’ of the Viasili vya Afrika are the Ancient Ancestors of the Blacks.[2]


H3: 
 
Bantu-Kushite/Æthiopians, i.e., Afrikans, are not composed of thousands of heterogeneous ethno-national Makabila [Kiswahili: Ethnic Groups] with distinctive, mutually exclusive cultural characteristics. Instead, their defining social institutions, mores and customs are subculture communities, composite societies that at one time in Global Afrikan history were social divisions of a greater Bantu-Kushite/Æthiopian national community, sharing a distinctive linguistic heritage and material and non-material culture with a regional culture hearth encompassing the lands of Upper KMT/Kemet and Lower Kush with important urban Wahenga na Wahenguzi commemoration complexes located at the border between Lower Kush and Upper KMT/Kemet on Sahel Island near the 6th Cataract of the ITRW HPI/Iteru Hapi [Kush/Kemet: Nile River], in the Dongola Bend region of Lower Kush near the 4th Cataract of the ITRW HPI/Iteru Hapi, at the Lower Kush capitol of  , IW MIRWIWЗ/Iu Miruiwa [Kush/Kemet: Island of Meroe] near the 1rst Cataract of the ITRW HPI/Iteru Hapi and at the Upper KMT/Kemet capitol city of WЗST/Wa-set.[3]


H4:  

The indigenous languages and autochthonous peoples of the Global Afrikan community comprise a genetic unity.[4]


H5:  

The indigenous languages and autochthonous peoples of the Global Afrikan community are derived from the multi-ethnic Afrikan Makabila which comprised Utamaduni Mkubwa ya Bantu-Kush, Utamaduni Mkubwa ya KMT/Kemet and the proto-Saharan civilization of Utamaduni Mkubwa ya Maa c. 15759 BKC - 3241 KC [c. 20000-1000 BCE].





[1] John D. Baldwin, Pre-Historic Nation; or Inquiries Concerning some of the Great Peoples and Civilizations of Antiquity, and their probable relation to a still older Civilization of the Ethiopians or Cushites of Arabia (New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1877) pp. 10

[2] John D. Baldwin, Pre-Historic Nation; or Inquiries Concerning some of the Great Peoples and Civilizations of Antiquity, and their probable relation to a still older Civilization of the Ethiopians or Cushites of Arabia (New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1877); Drusilla Dunjee Houston, Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire (Oklahoma: Universal Publishing Company, 1926)

[3] Theophile Obenga, “The Genetic Linguistic Relationship Between Egyptian (Ancient Egyptian and Coptic) and Modern Negro-African Languages,” in UNESCO, The General History of Africa Studies and Documents 1: The peopling of Ancient Egypt and the Deciphering of Meroitic Script Proceedings of the Symposium held in Cairo from 28 January to 3 February 1974 (Paris: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, 1978) pp. 65-72; Alfred M M'Imanyara, The Restatement of Bantu Origin and Meru History (Nairobi, Kenya: Longman Press, 1992); Kipkoeech araap Sambu, The Misiri Legend Explored: A Linguistic Inquiry into the Kalenjin People’s Oral Tradition of Ancient Egyptian Origin (Nairobi, Kenya: University of Nairobi Press, 2011); Raul Diaz Guevara, “Pan-Africanism: A Contorted Delirium or a Pseudo-nationalist Paradigm? Revivalist Critique,” SAGE Open (April-June 2013) 3 (2): 1–13 DOI: 10.1177/2158244013484474; Fergus Sharman, Linguistic Ties between Ancient Egyptian and Bantu: Uncovering Symbiotic Affinities and Relationships in Vocabulary (Boca Raton, Florida: Universal Publishers, 2014)

[4] L. Homburger, The Negro-African Languages (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul Limited, 1949); William. E. Welmers, "Niger-Congo Mande," Current Trends in Linguistics 7 (1971) pp.113-140; Theophile Obenga, “The Genetic Linguistic Relationship Between Egyptian (Ancient Egyptian and Coptic) and Modern Negro-African Languages,” in UNESCO, The General History of Africa Studies and Documents 1: The peopling of Ancient Egypt and the Deciphering of Meroitic Script Proceedings of the Symposium held in Cairo from 28 January to 3 February 1974 (Paris: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, 1978) pp. 65-72; Fergus Sharman, Linguistic Ties between Ancient Egyptian and Bantu: Uncovering Symbiotic Affinities and Relationships in Vocabulary (Boca Raton, Florida: Universal Publishers, 2014)

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